Home Dealerships NEWFOUNDLAND/ Dealerships (CANADA) 1st Production Mustang
NEWFOUNDLAND/ Dealerships (CANADA) 1st Production Mustang
Written by Double Dragon
Monday, 14 November 2011 19:05

NEWFOUNDLAND dealerships (CANADA) 1st Production Mustang

oneownercollectorcar.com

Writing and photography copyright D. S. Brown

George Parsons Ford, St. Johns, NF (became Regatta Ford)

Regatta Ford, St Johns, NF (formerly George G. R. Parsons Ford)

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

GEORGE PARSONS FORD, St Johns, NF (sold first production Mustang)

George Parsons Ford was located in St Johns, Newfoundland. The George G. R. Parsons dealership garnered some fame when it was revealed that this dealership had sold the very first production Mustang built. The first Mustangs off the line were not intended for sale. They were slated for use as display vehicles, test vehicles or for other promotional purposes. With the incredible buying frenzy that seized North America upon the release of the Mustang it took some time for Ford to become aware that Mustang number one had been accidentally sold.

George Parsons Ford had the distinction of being the dealership who sold that first Mustang. The first five Mustangs built were shipped to Canadian Ford dealers for display and demonstrator use. None of them were intended for sale but all five were sold. Ford probably recouped more publicity from this car driving around the street than it would have in a dealership showroom. However, the original intent of Ford was to keep the Mustangs on display in showrooms until inventory could be shipped. It is assumed that the first five Mustangs were sent to Canada to ensure that they would arrive in time for the grand opening which coordinated a huge media blitz prior to the unveiling of the Mustang in dealer showrooms all across North America.

Interestingly, the first Mustang built was a Wimbledon White convertible. Years later the first Pontiac Firebird off the line was a white convertible. Was it coincidence or did someone at GM recall that the first ponycar was a white convertible when figuring out what format the first Pontiac ponycar should take?

The Wimbledon White 1965 Mustang convertible carries serial number 5F08F100001. It was bought by airline pilot Captain Stanley Tucker. Tucker stopped to see what a crowd surrounding George Parsons Ford was looking at and saw the new Mustang. After eating dinner Parsons returned to the dealership and convinced owner George Parsons to sell him the car. Tucker wrote a check on the spot and took delivery the next morning.

Two weeks after the sale Ford tried to buy it back, but Tucker loved his new car and declined. Tucker was the only Mustang owner in Newfoundland for quite some time and caused a commotion whenever he drove his car. The Mustang was a 260 V8 with automatic and gave him no problems for the 2 years he owned it. Ford persisted in trying to buy back the car and presented an interesting deal which garnered some publicity for Ford in 1966.

When the one millionth Mustang was produced, Ford made sure it was a white convertible. Tucker made a straight trade from his 23 month old Mustang #1 for Mustang #1,000,001. Tucker bought number one on April 17, 1964 (introduction day) and traded it for number one million on March 2, 1966 at Dearborn, Michigan. The press release sent out at 11:00 AM EST drew the parallel between Tucker being a 'million mile pilot' and buying the one millionth Mustang.

Mustang Number one was restored and is on display at the Henry Ford museum. Number two was a blue six cylinder hardtop which has been discovered and restored.

Parsons Ford carried on until it changed hands and was renamed Regatta Ford.

Interestingly, Atlantic Canada has scored 2 number serial numbered Ford pony cars. See the story on Dryden Motors in the NEW BRUNSWICK section of the DEALERSHIPS for a story on Mercury Cougar number one.

See the story on Barr Ford, Philadelphia, PA for a story on another very early Mustang sale.

Last Updated ( Thursday, 18 March 2021 20:34 )